mapsedge: Me at Stone Bridge Coffee House (Default)
It's going to be an interesting few days at the office here until the dust settles.  I'm the only Obama supporter - or, at the very least, anti-McCain - in the office.  Grim times for MoneyMan and DataGuy.

Edit: I was partly mistaken.  Our salesperson, Molly, is glad of the outcome.  I hope I get the opportunity to ask her why.
mapsedge: Me at Stone Bridge Coffee House (Default)
It's going to be an interesting few days at the office here until the dust settles.  I'm the only Obama supporter - or, at the very least, anti-McCain - in the office.  Grim times for MoneyMan and DataGuy.

Edit: I was partly mistaken.  Our salesperson, Molly, is glad of the outcome.  I hope I get the opportunity to ask her why.
mapsedge: (eyebrows up)
Of course I have thoughts about the election. Do I want to write about them? Not really, no. For my own future reference, though, I ought to.

History making? Of course. Am I relieved? More than I expected I would be. The republicans - led by Dubya - and the "Christian" Right have trod on this country's freedoms in a my-way-or-the-hiway power-grab. We have been told what to be afraid of, and who we should hate because of it, for eight years. That is finally over.

Last night, I watched the campaign figurehead of that divisive group concede to a crowd of 3000.

Last night I watched a brown-skinned man1, a relative newcomer on the political stage, begin the process of unification and hope-bringing, to a crowd of over 100,000. His speech was moving and, I believe, honest.2 The speech was sober, with none of the self-congratulation he would have been fully entitled to. He reached out, made it about this country, and I am guardedly hopeful that once again I can be proud to be an American.

Cynically, I almost hoped to hear a news story about Dubya lying on the floor of the Oval Office, dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The republicans and radical right took a huge hit last night, and I am glad of it. Take your theocracy and shove it, Mr. Bush, it ain't workin' here no more.


1 Katie calls him "the tan man", because of his mixed-race parentage.
2 On a lighter note it took me forever to figure out where his teleprompters were.
mapsedge: (eyebrows up)
Of course I have thoughts about the election. Do I want to write about them? Not really, no. For my own future reference, though, I ought to.

History making? Of course. Am I relieved? More than I expected I would be. The republicans - led by Dubya - and the "Christian" Right have trod on this country's freedoms in a my-way-or-the-hiway power-grab. We have been told what to be afraid of, and who we should hate because of it, for eight years. That is finally over.

Last night, I watched the campaign figurehead of that divisive group concede to a crowd of 3000.

Last night I watched a brown-skinned man1, a relative newcomer on the political stage, begin the process of unification and hope-bringing, to a crowd of over 100,000. His speech was moving and, I believe, honest.2 The speech was sober, with none of the self-congratulation he would have been fully entitled to. He reached out, made it about this country, and I am guardedly hopeful that once again I can be proud to be an American.

Cynically, I almost hoped to hear a news story about Dubya lying on the floor of the Oval Office, dead of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. The republicans and radical right took a huge hit last night, and I am glad of it. Take your theocracy and shove it, Mr. Bush, it ain't workin' here no more.


1 Katie calls him "the tan man", because of his mixed-race parentage.
2 On a lighter note it took me forever to figure out where his teleprompters were.
mapsedge: Me at Stone Bridge Coffee House (Default)
Another reason to like where I live: our polling place is a small church at the end of our street.  No lines, no pollsters, no one handing out fliers or picketing with idiotic and oversimplified political platitudes.

I walked in, signed my name, punched my card, and walked out.

For the first time in my life I voted a (mostly) straight democratic ticket.  (Yes, Obama was in there, if you're interested.) The republicans had their chance and they fucked it up, and now I'm ready for a growing economy and a secular government.  If I want a theocracy, I'll go to Afghanistan: it seems to work for them.
mapsedge: Me at Stone Bridge Coffee House (Default)
Another reason to like where I live: our polling place is a small church at the end of our street.  No lines, no pollsters, no one handing out fliers or picketing with idiotic and oversimplified political platitudes.

I walked in, signed my name, punched my card, and walked out.

For the first time in my life I voted a (mostly) straight democratic ticket.  (Yes, Obama was in there, if you're interested.) The republicans had their chance and they fucked it up, and now I'm ready for a growing economy and a secular government.  If I want a theocracy, I'll go to Afghanistan: it seems to work for them.

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